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Testimonials

11/10/20

Video Interview

Discipline:

Arts and Humanities, Humanities

Nicola Di Cosmo

Henry Luce Foundation Professor of East Asian Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

Henry Luce Foundation Professor of East Asian Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

Bio:

Nicola Di Cosmo is the Henry Luce Foundation Professor of East Asian Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study, School of Historical Studies (2003-present). He holds a PhD from Indiana University in Uralic and Altaic Studies, and a BA from the University of Venice (Italy). He has been a Research Fellow at Cambridge University, taught at Harvard University and at the University of Canterbury (New Zealand) and held numerous visiting or teaching positions in Japan, China, France, Italy, and the US. He is also Visiting Professor of East Asian Studies at Princeton University.

His work has been on the history of Chinese and Inner Asian frontiers from the ancient to the modern periods, history of nomadic peoples, and history of late imperial China. His authored and edited books include Ancient China and Its Enemies: The Rise of Nomadic Power in east Asian History (Cambridge) Manchu-Mongol Relations on the Eve of the Qing Conquest (Brill), The Diary of a Manchu Soldier in Seventeenth Century China (Routledge) and several edited books: Military Culture in Imperial China (Harvard), The Cambridge History of Inner Asia, vol II (Cambridge), Warfare in Inner Asian History (Brill), and most recently Exchange and Empires in the Eurasian Late Antiquity (Cambridge 2018).

His most recent work tries to integrate paleoclimatic data and historical sources, with special reference to the history of Medieval Eurasia and the Mongol empire. His articles in this area have been published in Scientific Reports, Nature Geoscience, The Journal of Interdisciplinary History and Climate Change among others.

Webinar:

Recent advances in paleoclimate research and high-definition reconstructions of past climates allow today historians to benefit from an unprecedented level of knowledge about climatic changes in historical times. Understanding better the interplay between human and natural systems can be extremely useful for a more accurate historical analysis, while at the same time provide historical contexts for scientific research that have implications for the present.  However, basic questions have also emerged: what is the appropriate way to use climate data in historical studies? How can scientific data be integrated with other forms of historical evidence?  How should collaborations between scientists and historians be managed?  These and other questions are opening new frontiers of both historical and scientific knowledge and generating collaborative experiments with deep implications for our future understanding of the past.


To watch the video, click here.

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